Monday, 17 October 2011

New report: the 'World We Want'

Today is the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, a day officially recognized by the United Nations which aims to get the voices of poor and marginalised people around the world heard by decision makers.

To mark this date, Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP)’s new report ‘The World We Want’ will be launched by coalitions in 27 countries across the world. This report aims to take the messages of people affected by poverty, climate change, and social exclusion, to their leaders and to convince governments to take urgent action to end poverty and inequality.

Campaigners are coming together from 15-17 October to tell decision makers about the report through diverse actions, public mobilisation, and targeted advocacy. From concerts to letter writing campaigns and tree planting, people living in poverty worldwide will be ensuring their voices are heard.

The report showcases just some of the inspiring ways in which civil society has come together and taken action against poverty and inequality over the past year. This includes the work of End Water Poverty, which is highlighted in the report as a successful and growing movement of campaigners showing the real value of campaigning both nationally and internationally. The fantastic World’s Longest Toilet Queue and World Walks for Water events organized by our members and partners are given as examples of this success!

Walking for Water in Nepal

Alongside the report, civil society organizations all around the world are launching the 'Better Aid for The World We Want’ campaign which aims to mobilise public support for civil society asks towards the upcoming High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan, South Korea in November. The public are encouraged to sign a petition asking governments to ensure that citizens’ voices are heard in development and aid decisions. The signatures will be collected on campaign postcards as well as online at www.betteraid.org/campaign.

To find out more about GCAP’s work and to read the report, visit their website here.

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